21 ways to productively procrastinate

Procrastination — the thing in which you end up doing rather than do the thing you’re supposed to be doing.

Since my teenage years, I’ve been an avid consumer of productivity methods. However, like most people, I’m also prone to procrastination. Facebook, Twitter and every possible website out there would always find their ways back into my life and quickly de-prioritize what I’m supposed be doing.

While sheer willpower alone did work for some occasions, procrastination is something that often plagues my day and quickly sidetracks my intentions.

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10 lessons learnt from writing almost every day

Exactly a week ago today, I decided to go on a writing bender and produced 9 published articles on Medium. I wrote something every day (except Sunday) and pushed it for the people to consume.

Here are 10 lessons I learnt from the experience.

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What it means to be vulnerable

Vulnerable. adjective. Exposed to the possibility of being attacked or harmed, either physically or emotionally.

Vulnerability — something many of us avoid due to fear of being judged, hurt or failure. To be vulnerable means to put ourselves in a position that could potentially hurt us.

Many of us that fear vulnerability because somewhere in our lives, we’ve been hurt before. Weather it be a heart break, a rejection or a criticism. It made us aware of ourselves and we consciously avoid the possibility of being vulnerable again by dodging situations that could cause us the same pain, embarrassment or sense of rejection again.

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If you want to get rich, don’t save your money — spend it and spend it well

My parents weren’t the greatest when it came to money. By the time I was 11, they’ve managed to rack up quite mountain of credit card debt. When I was 12, I managed to convince them to get a debt consolidation from the bank and it took them another decade to pay it all off.

From that experience, of constantly wondering if you’re ever going to have enough for rent, utilities and food, I developed a hoarding saver mentality.

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156 applications later — how to write a killer CV and ace that interview

Whilst preparing for my maternity leave, I looked at exactly 156 resumes and did about a dozen interviews before finally landing on a guy last minute — a week before my final day at work.

There were bad resumes and good resumes. Then there were also ones that clearly didn’t read the advert or are just outright lies. While people wonder why companies don’t do courtesy rejection emails anymore, I now understand why.

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Why you should have a series of micro ambitious goals

Because big ambitious goals simply takes too long and nobody ain’t got time for that.

There’s something about big ambitious goals that doesn’t sit quite right with me. We set them. We fail. We set them again. We fail again. After some time, we eventually give up all together. Give me some claps if you agree.

It’s a vicious cycle and one that I wish to break for myself.

After examining my own habits, routines and series of actions and inactions that lead to my yearly goals remaining unaccomplished, I’ve decided to do something a little bit differently. This year, I’ve decided to set a series of micro ambitious goals on a daily and weekly basis.

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A comprehensive approach to chicken broth

Making a delicious chicken broth is easy. All you need is some chicken bones and whatever root vegetables you have in your fridge.

You don’t even have to use fresh chicken bones.

The thing with chicken broth is that it can be assembled using scraps and leftovers from your other dishes. The last one I made used the discarded bones from chicken thighs that I cooked up for dinner. Rather than letting it go to waste, I just chucked it in a pot of water and let it simmer with a carrot for a good hour.

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How to start a container vegetable garden

For many city dwellers who may be living in apartments or rental properties, starting a vegetable garden may feel like an impossible idea.

However, if there’s a will, there is always a way.

Container gardening is one way to get around this restriction. It can also make the task of moving a lot easier and less of a sunk cost than starting a raised bed.

Personally, I’m just starting up my container garden again. I used to grow them on my deck back in 2016. When I had my baby, I stopped gardening all together because life got too overwhelming.

However, at our new place, I’ve decided to start up my container gardens again.

Here are some of the lessons learned about starting a container vegetable garden.

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How financially free are you?

Growing up, I was taught the popular version of how money works – you work for it, you use it and you save some of it.

Along the way, student loans got added to the fold, then a credit card.

While my personal debt is not as big as a lot of other people out there, it is still a significant enough amount that’s been following me around for the past 8 years. In truth, most of my debt was in my student loan balance. Somehow, I managed to rack up a $48k debt for my degree.

I went to University without actually understanding the long term ramifications on my personal finances.

I went to University because I was expected to.

I went because I wasn’t told there was an alternative choice.

I borrowed a ton of money to make it happen.

But that’s all done now.

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Is MSG bad?

I grew up on MSG.

My mother had a small container of it in the kitchen, next to the assortment of soy sauces that are common in an Asian household. For us, it was the holy grail of making anything taste good.

However, over the years, MSG’s reputation went down the drain after word started to spread about how bad it is for your health.

It didn’t take my mother long to jump onto the healthy bandwagon and got rid of the offending white crystals that could have been mistaken for really large grains of salt. But not everyone got rid of it.

Her friends still use it in their cooking and the compound is still used widely in ready-made foods and instant noodles. It’s not outlawed by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and is considered “generally recognized as safe”.

So how bad can it really be? I decided to go investigating.

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